A few Hours ago, The Washington post come out with a story that claims that the Trump Foundation illegally solicited donations without proper certification to do so.

Here is an excerpt from that story:

The Donald J. Trump Foundation is not like other charities. An investigation of the foundation — including examinations of 17 years of tax filings and interviews with more than 200 individuals or groups listed as donors or beneficiaries — found that it collects and spends money in a very unusual manner.

For one thing, nearly all of its money comes from people other than Trump. In tax records, the last gift from Trump was in 2008. Since then, all of the donations have been other people’s money — an arrangement that experts say is almost unheard of for a family foundation.

Trump then takes that money and generally does with it as he pleases. In many cases, he passes it on to other charities, which often are under the impression that it is Trump’s own money.

In two cases, he has used money from his charity to buy himself a gift. In one of those cases — not previously reported — Trump spent $20,000 of money earmarked for charitable purposes to buy a six-foot-tall painting of himself.

Money from the Trump Foundation has also been used for political purposes, which is against the law. The Washington Post reported this month that Trump paid a penalty this year to the Internal Revenue Service for a 2013 donation in which the foundation gave $25,000 to a campaign group affiliated with Florida Attorney General Pamela Bondi (R).

s: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/how-donald-trump-retooled-his-charity-to-spend-other-peoples-money/2016/09/10/da8cce64-75df-11e6-8149-b8d05321db62_story.html

The story is false and has inaccurate reporting that should be deemed as slander, even to the most generic of persons. There are SEVERAL errors and lies within the story that threatens it’s credibility. I have looked through tax returns and documents, and this is what I found.

In 2009 and 2010, [The Charles Evans Foundation] gave a total of $150,000 to the Donald J. Trump Foundation, a small charity that the Republican presidential nominee founded in 1987.

Then, Trump’s foundation turned around and made donations to the police group in South Florida. In those years, the Trump Foundation’s gifts totaled $150,000.

Trump had effectively turned the Evans Foundation’s gifts into his own gifts, without adding any money of his own.

It was 2009-2011, not 2 years, in increments of $50,000.

These were the expenses:

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Nearly 90% of the donations went to Charities and funds. It’s not clear where the rest money went, but no proof has arisen to prove that the claims of using money for himself are true. It’s likely that the excess revenue went to other costs fro the Trump organization, and not personal profit.

Other donations include:

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-Prestige Mills, A Carpet Corporation.

-Comedy Central: a US TV cable station

-Charles Evans Foundation: Non-profit organization.

-Rich Ebers Inside Sports and Entertainment group: corporate hospitality, event management, and marketing firm owned by Creative Artists Agency, according to the NYT.

And other corporations and non-profits.

The Donald J. Trump Foundation is not like other charities. An investigation of the foundation — including examinations of 17 years of tax filings and interviews with more than 200 individuals or groups listed as donors or beneficiaries — found that it collects and spends money in a very unusual manner.

For one thing, nearly all of its money comes from people other than Trump. In tax records, the last gift from Trump was in 2008. Since then, all of the donations have been other people’s money — an arrangement that experts say is almost unheard of for a family foundation.

Trump then takes that money and generally does with it as he pleases. In many cases, he passes it on to other charities, which often are under the impression that it is Trump’s own money.

In two cases, he has used money from his charity to buy himself a gift. In one of those cases — not previously reported — Trump spent $20,000 of money earmarked for charitable purposes to buy a six-foot-tall painting of himself.

Money from the Trump Foundation has also been used for political purposes, which is against the law. The Washington Post reported this month that Trump paid a penalty this year to the Internal Revenue Service for a 2013 donation in which the foundation gave $25,000 to a campaign group affiliated with Florida Attorney General Pamela Bondi (R).

I have found no records or evidence of this ever occurring, and that No tax listing has listed any other expenses besides the ones below:

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In an effort to find proof of Trump’s personal giving, The Post has contacted more than 300 charities with some ties to the GOP nominee. Some got money from the Trump Foundation (). In other cases, Trump had a personal connection () to the charity or its leaders . Some were charities that DonorSearch database records () indicated he might have given to. A variety of other reasons () included media mentions, gala attendance, or involvement with Trump’s TV show “Celebrity Apprentice.”

So far, The Post’s search has turned up little. Between 2008 and this May — when Trump made good on a pledge to give $1 million to a veterans’ group — its search has identified just one personal gift from Trump’s own pocket.

Here is that list:

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Well, Get Ready, I am about to post all of the Donations that the Trump Foundation has made since 2002, ladies and gentlemen. He stops at 2009, we’re going all the way back to 2001-2. Here are some “Bombshell” accusation made by the writer:

Trump started his foundation in 1987 with a narrow purpose: to give away some of the proceeds from his book “The Art of the Deal.”

Nearly three decades later, the Trump Foundation is still a threadbare, skeletal operation.

The most money it has ever reported having was $3.2 million at the end of 2009. At last count, that total had shrunk to $1.3 million. By comparison, Oprah Winfrey — who is worth $1.5 billion less than Trump, according to a Forbes magazine estimate — has a foundation with $242 million in the bank. At the end of 2014, the Clinton Foundation had $440 million in assets.

In a few cases, Trump seemed to solicit donations only to immediately give them away. But his foundation has also received a handful of bigger donations — including $5 million from professional-wrestling executives Vince and Linda McMahon — that Trump handed out a little at a time.

The foundation has no paid staffers. It has an unpaid board consisting of four Trumps — Donald, Ivanka, Eric and Donald Jr. — and one Trump Organization employee.

In 2014, at last report, each said they worked a half-hour a week.

The Trump Foundation still gives out small, scattered gifts — which seem driven by the demands of Trump’s businesses and social life, rather than by a desire to support charitable causes.

The foundation makes a few dozen donations a year, usually in amounts from $1,000 to $50,000. It gives to charities that rent Trump’s ballrooms. It gives to charities whose leaders buttonholed Trump on the golf course (and then try, in vain, to get him to offer a repeat donation the next year).

It even gives in situations in which Trump publicly put himself on the hook for a donation — as when he promised a gift “out of my wallet” on NBC’s “The Celebrity Apprentice.” The Trump Foundation paid off most of those on-air promises. A TV production company paid others. The Post could find no instance in which a celebrity’s charity got a gift from Trump’s own wallet.

Another time, Trump went on TV’s “Extra” for a contest called “Trump pays your bills!”

A professional spray-tanner won. The Trump Foundation paid her bills.

Let’s see what the donations say: (Click on the Images to make them Larger)

FY 2002, 2003 and 2004

FY 2005, 2006, 2007

Fiscal Years 2008, 2009, 2010

FY2o11

FY2012

Rest of these returns:

Come on, Washington Post, you can do better than this.

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